Brand
toll-free 800-836-8278
toll-free 800-836-8278

 PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options.

PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options.

Protecting What Matters Most

How to deal with a high-conflict parent

| Feb 16, 2021 | Child Custody & Support

Once you’ve finalized your divorce in Rhode Island, many parenting guides recommend keeping in touch with your former spouse. Unfortunately, doing so isn’t always the best option. If they keep causing conflict or trying to turn your child against you, you might have to cut them out of your life as much as possible.

How can you deal with a high-conflict co-parent?

Some parents insist on creating conflict even after a judge has settled the child custody case. If you have shared custody, you’ll have to maintain some contact so you know what’s going on with your child. However, you might want to limit communication as much as possible.

Some parents use a technique called “parallel parenting.” This involves communicating with your former spouse as little as possible. When you do talk to them, it’s usually to address important issues like transporting your child between houses. Other than that, you stay out of each other’s lives so your former spouse can’t create conflict.

To communicate with your former spouse, you might want to use text messages or a third-party app so that you have written proof of your communications. Your child custody attorney might need this information if your former spouse tries to challenge you in court.

How can you deal with a high-conflict parent?

Whether they’re trying to make you lose your child custody case or just trying to stir up trouble, your former spouse might make your life difficult after your divorce. An attorney could help you withdraw from the conflict and communicate with your former spouse as little as possible.