Rioles Law Offices - Divorce
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PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options.

Protecting What Matters Most

What separates alimony and child support payments?

On Behalf of | May 5, 2022 | Alimony, Blog, Child Custody & Support

In the state of Rhode Island, individuals may be entitled to alimony and child support as part of a final divorce settlement. Whether you are entitled to receive these types of assistance depends on a number of factors unique to your own case. Let’s take a look at the key differences between alimony and child support and how they may help you as a single person.

What is child support?

As the name implies, child support payments are to be used to meet your child’s basic needs. These needs generally include adequate food, clothing and shelter. However, they may be used to pay for medical, educational or other expenses if necessary, and in some cases, they can be used to buy a car, upgrade your home or take care of other costs indirectly related to providing your child with a quality upbringing.

What is alimony?

Spousal support payments are intended to help you maintain a reasonable standard of living after your divorce is finalized. Generally speaking, alimony can be used for any purpose that you see fit. It’s worth noting that these payments no longer count as income to the recipient or as a tax write-off to the person making them. Depending on your age, physical condition and ability to earn a steady income, alimony payments may be received on a temporary or permanent basis.

If you are planning to end your marriage, it’s important to obtain financial documents such as bank statements or tax return forms. Doing so may make it easier to show that you should be entitled to alimony or child support payments. It may also make it easier to establish that you should be entitled to a majority share of joint assets.

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