Rioles Law Offices - Divorce
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PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options.

Protecting What Matters Most

Serious parenting plan concerns

On Behalf of | Aug 25, 2022 | Blog, Child Custody & Support

After a divorce decree is finalized by the court, the terms go into effect. Those terms may include child custody arrangements based on agreed-upon parenting plans. Ex-spouses in Rhode Island may carry some ill feelings long after the marriage ends, and some problematic behaviors could carry over to the relationship with the children. Such behavior may be troubling for the child and affect the custody decision.

Parenting plans and mistakes

Some issues with parenting plans could result from unexpected circumstances. For example, one parent may need to alter a visitation schedule because of pressing job responsibilities. Effective communications between the spouses/parents may straighten such issues out. However, more serious and problematic concerns could arise when a parent’s behavior impacts the child negatively.

A parent who wants the child to take sides in disagreements could harm the child’s development. A child may feel stressed and frightened over a parent’s loyalty test demands. Even so, a parent could ignore the child’s plight and ask the young one to act as a spy and provide information about the ex-spouse’s personal life.

Using a child as a go-between messenger may also cause trouble. Anyone wishing to cut off lines of communication with an ex-spouse and relay messages through a child could be making a significant mistake.

Addressing problems with the other parent

Although the child custody decision occurred during the finalization of the divorce, the decision could face changes. A parent may petition the court to change a child custody agreement provided the parent has good cause. If an ex-spouse’s behavior causes the child emotional distress, the court may take the request quite seriously.

Feelings of anger and resentment towards an ex-spouse may cloud judgment. Children could deal with the fallout of such sentiments, and parents may benefit from understanding how their actions may cause pain.

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