Rioles Law Offices - Divorce
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PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options.

Protecting What Matters Most

Why your parenting style matters

On Behalf of | Dec 14, 2022 | Child Custody & Support

Several factors are typically evaluated by Rhode Island courts when reviewing child custody cases. A judge will likely consider your parenting style when deciding if you should have custody or visitation rights. There are four main parenting styles for raising children, and your preferred method may profoundly impact your custody case and your kids’ future.

Looking at authoritarian and authoritative styles

Authoritarian parents demand that their children constantly adhere to strict rules, while authoritative parents expect their kids to meet expectations and are more likely to involve their kids in determining what those expectations should be. Furthermore, an authoritative parent acts as a guide rather than a disciplinarian. By providing a supportive, safe and structured environment, parents can help their children develop the ability to both rely on themselves and function well in a group setting.

Pitfalls of permissive or uninvolved parenting

Permissive or uninvolved parents may put their kids at risk because they don’t typically provide the structure children need to succeed. Courts tend not to look favorably on parents who choose not to be heavily involved in their child’s life, which can have a significant impact on child custody or visitation rights. It can be especially true if there’s any evidence of neglect or abuse. Kids subject to permissive or uninvolved parenting styles may have mental health problems while growing up and into adulthood.

Assuming the courts value your parenting style and consider you fit as a parent, you’ll likely be allowed to have custody of your child or visitation after a separation or divorce. Your child’s wishes, statements from a child’s teacher or other evidence may be used to obtain a favorable child custody ruling.

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